Speaker: Rick Weinstein

Appreciating Hitchcock’s Visual Artistry (before computers!)

On Sunday, August 8th we’ll take another look back at the cinematic artistry of the late, great Alfred Hitchcock.  In this year’s installment we will show visually artistic images from some of his classic films, when there were no computers to create special effects.  From the exotic dream sequence of 1945’s Spellbound to the use … Continue reading Appreciating Hitchcock’s Visual Artistry (before computers!)

“Dave Brubeck’s Jazz: Harmony and Humanity”

In the 1950s, Jazz—the most American of art forms—experienced dramatic change as several contrasting styles vied for the public’s attention.  Big Band Swing, popularized by Benny Goodman and Duke Ellington, partially gave way to Bebop, the hard-driving and frenetic music most associated with Charlie Parker and Dizzy Gillespie.  Meanwhile, Miles Davis, who played in “Mr. … Continue reading “Dave Brubeck’s Jazz: Harmony and Humanity”

“Hot” and “Cold” War Through the Cinematic Lens of Alfred Hitchcock

Between 1925 and 1976 Alfred Hitchcock, the acclaimed “Master of Suspense,” directed 53 feature films that stimulated viewers’ imaginations, and sometimes scared the hell out of them.  But his treatment of specific subjects, such as obsession, psychoanalysis, and guilt, cannot be overlooked.  During the 1940s he devoted considerable attention to the events surrounding World War … Continue reading “Hot” and “Cold” War Through the Cinematic Lens of Alfred Hitchcock

“Appreciating Hitchcock’s Visual Artistry (before computers!)”

On Sunday, August 8th, we’ll take another look back at the cinematic artistry of the late, great Alfred Hitchcock.  In this year’s installment we will show visually artistic images from some of his classic films, when there were no computers to create special effects.  From the exotic dream sequence of 1945’s Spellbound to the use … Continue reading “Appreciating Hitchcock’s Visual Artistry (before computers!)”